Tuesday, September 11, 2007

In This Smoking Gun Existence


I wonder how the world really looks to young kids growing up? I mean, they talk the talk, but how do they know what's going on in the world? We've been in this latest Orwellian cycle of war and revolution so long that I'm teaching people who were born just before the first Persian Gulf War -- even 9/11 seems like ancient history or a cyber-game to many of them.

So where's Lola Falana to keep things simple? That's her in a Turkish poster for Lola Colt (1967) -- probably getting ready to shoot villains and break into song (in this case, "Scrivimi il tuo nome"). You want simple? Fahget about it.


A Crude Awakening: The Oil Crash (2006) is one of the cheeriest documentaries I've seen in a long time (kidding!). It rivals Al Gore's predictions in the little shop of horrors department. The gist: expect even more Orwellian wars and frantic grabs for natural resources. Not to mention more sabotage and disruption -- as just happened in Mexico. And let's not forget sequels to Katrina, Rita and Wilma. Hummers, forward! Daddy, who are we gonna fight today?


But look at the bright side: India, China and Brazil are developing fast! Who needs wars when mere economic development and demographics can crush us in the end anyway? Woo-hoo! Here, Shriya Saran is about to break into her own song: "Happy Birthday to me!"

Today's Rune: The Mystery Rune.

Birthdays: Pierre de Ronsard, Vicomte de Turenne (Henri de la Tour d'Auvergne), O. Henry (b. William Sydney Porter, near Greensboro, NC), D. H. Lawrence, Pinto Colvig (Bozo the Clown), Theodor Ludwig Wiesengrund Adorno, Jessica Mitford, Brian De Palma (DePalma), Lola Falana, Leo Kottke, Virginia Madsen, Moby (b. Richard Melville Hall), Ludacris (b. Christopher Brian Bridges), Shriya Saran.

4 comments:

the walking man said...

"I wonder how the world really looks to young kids growing up? I mean, they talk the talk, but how do they know what's going on in the world? We've been in this latest Orwellian cycle of war and revolution so long that I'm teaching people who were born just before the first Persian Gulf War -- even 9/11 seems like ancient history or a cyber-game to many of them."

they know what's going on in the world because it is their older siblings, moms, dads, doing the fighting, whether on the sands or the streets.

What do your students tell you of what they know beyond the braggadocio of youth?
Just curious.

Bubs said...

Your point about how things look to kids is well taken. I remember taking my daughter to see Apollo 13, and during one scene where all the NASA engineers take out pads of paper and slide rules to figure some problem out she asked why they weren't using the computers they were sitting in front of.

I explained that calculators hadn't been invented yet, and the computers she saw ran on tapes and punch cards...she was stunned. She's 18 now, just 2 years old with no memory of the first Gulf War.

Strange times.

JR's Thumbprints said...

My students haven't a clue. They can't even grasp today's political cartoons in the newspaper. But asks them about "Fiddy Cent" and they'll tell you his life history.

t said...

Lola Falana - hot. I checked out her bio because the name is Yoruba. Roots, I guess.